Difference between revisions of "Napoléon Bonaparte"

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[[image:napoleon_bonaparte_portrait.jpg|right|thumb|180px|Napoléon Bonaparte]][[image:napoleon_bonap_horseback.jpg|right|thumb|180px|Napoléon Bonaparte and his horse Vizir.]]'''Napoléon Bonaparte''' (August 15, 1769 Ajaccio, Corsica - May 5, 1821 St. Helena) was a general of the [[French Revolution]], and the ruler of France as '''First Consul''' (''Premier Consul'') of the First French Republic from November 11, [[1799]] to [[May 18]], [[1804]], then as Emperor of the French (''Empereur des Français'') and King of Italy under the name '''Napoleon I''' from [[May 18]], [[1804]] to April 6, 1814, and again briefly from March 22, to June 22, 1815.
 
[[image:napoleon_bonaparte_portrait.jpg|right|thumb|180px|Napoléon Bonaparte]][[image:napoleon_bonap_horseback.jpg|right|thumb|180px|Napoléon Bonaparte and his horse Vizir.]]'''Napoléon Bonaparte''' (August 15, 1769 Ajaccio, Corsica - May 5, 1821 St. Helena) was a general of the [[French Revolution]], and the ruler of France as '''First Consul''' (''Premier Consul'') of the First French Republic from November 11, [[1799]] to [[May 18]], [[1804]], then as Emperor of the French (''Empereur des Français'') and King of Italy under the name '''Napoleon I''' from [[May 18]], [[1804]] to April 6, 1814, and again briefly from March 22, to June 22, 1815.
  
===Re-establishing Slavery in the Colonies===
+
====Re-establishing Slavery in the Colonies====
 
"On the 20th of May, [[1801]], Bonaparte published the infamous decree which placed the French colonies in the state in which they were before the year [[1789]], and which, authorizing the slave-trade, abrogated all laws to the contrary. This execrable {{fn|1}}  measure marks the real character of the Corsican adventurer, and hands his name down to posterity covered with disgrace. Soon, however, did he find that in an evil hour he had overstepped the limits of prudence; and therefore he put forth another decree which hypocritically excepted [[Saint Domingo]] and Guadeloupe, "''because these islands are free, not only by right, but in fact, whilst the other colonies are actually in slavery, and it would be dangerous to put an end to that state of things.''" ([[Toussaint L'Ouverture: A Biography and Autobiography|Beard]] p. 154)
 
"On the 20th of May, [[1801]], Bonaparte published the infamous decree which placed the French colonies in the state in which they were before the year [[1789]], and which, authorizing the slave-trade, abrogated all laws to the contrary. This execrable {{fn|1}}  measure marks the real character of the Corsican adventurer, and hands his name down to posterity covered with disgrace. Soon, however, did he find that in an evil hour he had overstepped the limits of prudence; and therefore he put forth another decree which hypocritically excepted [[Saint Domingo]] and Guadeloupe, "''because these islands are free, not only by right, but in fact, whilst the other colonies are actually in slavery, and it would be dangerous to put an end to that state of things.''" ([[Toussaint L'Ouverture: A Biography and Autobiography|Beard]] p. 154)
  
===The Lousiana Purchase===
+
====The Lousiana Purchase====
 
In [[1803]], Bonaparte faced a major setback when an army he sent in [[1801]] under the command of [[General Leclerc]] (After Leclercs death in [[1802]] this force was led by General [[Rochambeau]]) to reconquer [[Saint-Domingue]] and re-establish slavery, was destroyed by a fierce resistance of the Haitian fighters led by [[Toussaint Louverture]] and after Toussaint had been deported to France, [[Jean-Jacques Dessalines]]. Recognizing that the French possessions on the mainland of North America would now be indefensible, and facing imminent war with Britain, he sold them to the United States —the [[The Revolution and the Louisiana Purchase|Louisiana Purchase]]—for less than three cents per acre ($7.40/km²).  
 
In [[1803]], Bonaparte faced a major setback when an army he sent in [[1801]] under the command of [[General Leclerc]] (After Leclercs death in [[1802]] this force was led by General [[Rochambeau]]) to reconquer [[Saint-Domingue]] and re-establish slavery, was destroyed by a fierce resistance of the Haitian fighters led by [[Toussaint Louverture]] and after Toussaint had been deported to France, [[Jean-Jacques Dessalines]]. Recognizing that the French possessions on the mainland of North America would now be indefensible, and facing imminent war with Britain, he sold them to the United States —the [[The Revolution and the Louisiana Purchase|Louisiana Purchase]]—for less than three cents per acre ($7.40/km²).  
  

Revision as of 16:50, 17 February 2006

The First Consul

Napoléon Bonaparte
Napoléon Bonaparte and his horse Vizir.
Napoléon Bonaparte (August 15, 1769 Ajaccio, Corsica - May 5, 1821 St. Helena) was a general of the French Revolution, and the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the First French Republic from November 11, 1799 to May 18, 1804, then as Emperor of the French (Empereur des Français) and King of Italy under the name Napoleon I from May 18, 1804 to April 6, 1814, and again briefly from March 22, to June 22, 1815.

Re-establishing Slavery in the Colonies

"On the 20th of May, 1801, Bonaparte published the infamous decree which placed the French colonies in the state in which they were before the year 1789, and which, authorizing the slave-trade, abrogated all laws to the contrary. This execrable 1 measure marks the real character of the Corsican adventurer, and hands his name down to posterity covered with disgrace. Soon, however, did he find that in an evil hour he had overstepped the limits of prudence; and therefore he put forth another decree which hypocritically excepted Saint Domingo and Guadeloupe, "because these islands are free, not only by right, but in fact, whilst the other colonies are actually in slavery, and it would be dangerous to put an end to that state of things." (Beard p. 154)

The Lousiana Purchase

In 1803, Bonaparte faced a major setback when an army he sent in 1801 under the command of General Leclerc (After Leclercs death in 1802 this force was led by General Rochambeau) to reconquer Saint-Domingue and re-establish slavery, was destroyed by a fierce resistance of the Haitian fighters led by Toussaint Louverture and after Toussaint had been deported to France, Jean-Jacques Dessalines. Recognizing that the French possessions on the mainland of North America would now be indefensible, and facing imminent war with Britain, he sold them to the United States —the Louisiana Purchase—for less than three cents per acre ($7.40/km²).


Note 1: Execrable: adj.

1. Deserving of execration; hateful.
2. Extremely inferior; very bad: an execrable meal.

See also

References

  • Napoleon I of France. (2005, December 7). Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 09:21, December 7, 2005 [1].
  • Beard, J. R. (John Relly) (1863). Toussaint L'Ouverture: A Biography and Autobiography. Chapel Hill, NC: Academic Affairs Library, UNC-CH. Online Publication
  • Execrable. (n.d.). The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition. Retrieved January, 13, 2006, from Answers.com Web site: [2]

External links