Difference between revisions of "Anacaona"

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'''Anacaona''', (also ''The Golden Flower''), was [[Taíno]] queen and the wife of Caonabo, one of the five caciques who lived on the the island of [[Kiskeya]] (also called Hispaniola) at the time of [[Columbus]] arrival in [[1492]]. She was hailed as a composer of ballads and narrative poems, called areitos.  
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'''Anacaona''' ([[Arawak]] for ''Golden Flower'') (born in Yaguana (today the town of [[Léogâne]], [[Haiti]]) was a [[Taíno]] queen and the wife of Caonabo, one of the five caciques who lived on the the island of [[Kiskeya]] (also called Hispaniola) at the time of [[Columbus]] arrival in [[1492]]. She was hailed as a composer of ballads and narrative poems, called areitos.  
  
 
The Spanish Governor [[Nicolas de Ovando]] ordered the arrest of Anacaona  and had her executed. Anacaona is celebrated as one of the heroes of Haiti's struggle against colonialism and one of the many women in the fight that ultimately led to the successful Haitian Revolution and the [[Act of Independence]] in [[1804]].
 
The Spanish Governor [[Nicolas de Ovando]] ordered the arrest of Anacaona  and had her executed. Anacaona is celebrated as one of the heroes of Haiti's struggle against colonialism and one of the many women in the fight that ultimately led to the successful Haitian Revolution and the [[Act of Independence]] in [[1804]].
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==External link==
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[[Category:Who's Who|Anacaona]]
 
[[Category:Who's Who|Anacaona]]
 
[[Category:Women|Anacaona]]
 
[[Category:Women|Anacaona]]

Revision as of 03:12, 11 April 2006

Anacaona (Arawak for Golden Flower) (born in Yaguana (today the town of Léogâne, Haiti) was a Taíno queen and the wife of Caonabo, one of the five caciques who lived on the the island of Kiskeya (also called Hispaniola) at the time of Columbus arrival in 1492. She was hailed as a composer of ballads and narrative poems, called areitos.

The Spanish Governor Nicolas de Ovando ordered the arrest of Anacaona and had her executed. Anacaona is celebrated as one of the heroes of Haiti's struggle against colonialism and one of the many women in the fight that ultimately led to the successful Haitian Revolution and the Act of Independence in 1804.

External link